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Something to think about ...

People everywhere are confronted with worries about their life and the environment. Often people worry about things that don't even exist or, things that never will happen. Worry gets the best of people who do nothing but think, think and think about things that seem to be going against them. Sometimes this can lead to resentment towards other people and doing things to hurt them in order to, somehow, appease the worry or get people's attention.

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Long ago, in the winter, when Inuit didn't know anything about Christmas, they used to call it the Great Plain Moon. When the moon was full and bright, Inuit used to put a shade over their ice window from the outside. Since they had no cloth they used somthing else for a shade. When everyone fell asleep, someone would take the shade away. it was hard to know who did it.

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A seminar on the standardization of Inuktitut syllabics leads to a number of recommendations, including new syllabic characters. The Army comes to Eskimo Point for Exercise Northern Rambler. Rankin Inlet gets a new school, Arviat and Baker Lake describe some of their economic development activities, Inuit children visit the south and Alice Suluk shares some delightful traditional Inuit tales.

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Kivalliq residents concerned about their children going to school in Frobisher Bay visit to learn first-hand what it's really like to live there. Ski-doo races take place in Repulse Bay. Whale Cove celebrates Easter games and ski-doo races. What is family planning? Know your months -- Embryoed Caribou Season and Shedding Season. Paddy Gardiner visits Eskimo Point to teach a communications course and Bruce Taylor from CBC Churchill comes to instruct residents on how to make a good radio program. Arviat ladies learn to sew knit-wear material and a collection of letters to the Editor encourage Inuit to Write and to be proud of their culture. Polar Bear quotas and sport hunting are an issue of concern in Coral Harbour and residents of the Keewatin are encouraged to report oil spills and contamination on the land.

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The Keewatin Echo newspaper was published monthly by the Keewatin Region Adult Education Staff of the Government of the Northwest Territories. This particular issue was published in November 1971 in Eskimo Point, N.W.T. (now Arviat, Nunavut) and was edited by Mark Kalluak of Arviat. This issue was digitized by the Nunavut Arctic College Learning Materials Centre in Arviat to ensure the stories, writings, history and content contained within will be archived, preserved and accessible for future generations to discover. We hope you, and our fellow residents in Arviat enjoy reading it

Download the complete November 1971 edition of the Keewatin Echo:

Click here to read the complete, original issue of the November 1971 Keewatin Echo in English and Inuktitut (PDF).

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When a language dies ...

We live and learn. Every day of our lives we learn something about ourselves, about others, or about the world around us. We learn in different ways, at different speeds.

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In the Keewatin Echo, Issue 34 (February 1971): Three Natives and first woman elected to NWT Council; Eskimos Chosen as Targets for research; Caribou Meat Safe to Eat; Sampling Life on Trapping; Notice to big Game Hunters; Information Officer Appointed; Dear Editor; Legends; Sum Up; My Life (Part 2)

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In this issue of the Keewatin Echo (Issue 32) from December 1970: Eskimo Calendar; Milieu 70; Countries often in the news; Inuit Disappearing; Ladies Group News; Dear Editor; Editorial; Surnames; Community Cooperation; Eskimo Point Inn

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