Nunavut Arctic College

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Thanks to all those that were able to make it to the Graduation Luncheon and our Graduation ceremony on May 15th. 

Published in Nunavut Research News

"Studying where you live and want to teach makes sense and would solve most worries about housing and leaving the family. NTEP would become more attractive and retention would improve."

Published in Nunavut Research News

Third year Nunavut Teacher Education Program (NTEP) student Karen Inootik, former NTEP student Rebecca Jones and Paul Berger, Associate Professor of Education at Lakehead University, presented the results of a three-year research study at the Nunavut Research Institute in Iqaluit this week.

The team’s research, “Why Not Teach? Inuit High School Students Thoughts on Becoming a Teacher” began in 2009 and was funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC).

Published in Education News

NRI Contacts

NRI Contact information

Nunavut Research Institute
Box 1720, Iqaluit, NU
XOA OHO
Building 959

Phone: 867-979-7280 / Fax: 867-979-7109

OUR STAFF

Mary Ellen Thomas
Senior Research Officer
Tel: 867 979-7202
Cel: 867-222-2864
e-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mosha Cote
Manager, Research Liaison
Tel: 867 979-7279
e-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Rick Armstrong
Manager, Scientific Support Services
Tel: 867 979-7280
Cel: 867-222-4864
e-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Jamal Shirley

Manager, Research Design and Policy Development
Tel: 867- 979-7290
e-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mosesie Kilabuk
Administrative Officer
Tel: 867-979-7277
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International Polar Year (IPY)

IPY 2012 Conference in Montreal (read more)

Four times in the past 125 years, scientists from around the world have come together to carry out collaborative scientific research and exploration programs in the polar regions. Each program came to be known as a “polar year,” and involved an intense period of cooperative research providing a snapshot in time. This work resulted in major new scientific discoveries and fundamentally changed how science is conducted in these areas.

Canada has now participated in all four successful polar years. The most recent International Polar Year (IPY) officially began in March 2007 and wrapped up in March 2009. This period involved scientists from 67 countries, who employed new research technologies to carry out a broad range of cooperative scientific studies.

Nunavut hosted more scientific research than any other Canadian province or territory. In 2007, it hosted 50 IPY research activities involving 400 researchers. In 2008, 156 research activities took place in the territory, involving 461 scientists. The results of their work will greatly improve our understanding of conditions and changes occurring in the polar regions and their influence around the globe.

Since 2006, Nunavut Research Institute has hosted the IPY coordination office for the territory. Its work will continue until 2011.

NRI’s Amanda Kilabuk is the Nunavut IPY coordinator.

Over the past three years, the Nunavut IPY coordination office has worked to engage and support local communities and agencies to develop their own IPY research proposals.  We’ve also helped evaluate the social and cultural merit of IPY research activity in the territory, and we’ve provided research proponents with information on permitting requirements and helped them to plan community consultations, outreach and reporting activities in Nunavut.

Now that the official observation period for IPY 2007-08 has wrapped up, Nunavummiut should soon begin to reap the benefits of the research results. The Nunavut coordination office will continue to be a contact point for information dissemination, networking and dialogue related to IPY until 2011. We will continue to develop materials to make research available to Nunavummiut, and actively raise awareness of the legacy which be left by this exciting scientific period.

This project/exhibit was made possible with the generous support of the Government of Canada Program for International Polar Year.

For More Information

IPY Nunavut coordination office
Nunavut Research Institute
E-Mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Phone : (867) 979-7298
Fax : (867) 979-7109

Federal Program Office
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Phone : (819) 953-2007
Fax : (819) 953-9066

Canadian IPY Secretariat
University of Alberta
E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Phone : (780) 492-7245
Fax : (780) 492-0493

 

Links

International IPY Joint Committee



Canadian Federal IPY Program Office

Educational Programming

Simply Science Summer Camp

The camp is a 2 week summer science education program that NRI delivers to school children (9 to 13 years of age) in various Nunavut communities. In a day school setting, participants learn how to develop their own websites, and they conduct a variety of educational chemistry, biology and physics experiments relevant to the Arctic.

For more information about the summer programs contact the NRI’s Manager of Scientific Support Services, Rick Armstrong, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

Simply Science Schools Program

PromoScience is a National Science and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) program supporting science education and outreach initiatives by researchers and other scientific experts targeting schools. Nunavut Research Institute uses PromScience grants to operate our Simply Science program, which brings leading scientists, educators and researchers from various disciplines to Nunavut to deliver presentations and workshops to elementary and high school students.

For more information about the Simply Science program contact the NRI’s Manager of Scientific Support Services, Rick Armstrong, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

Research Presentations

Researchers working in Nunavut are encouraged to share their research with the public. NRI arranges talks for researchers visiting Iqaluit.

For more information contact NRI’s Manager of Scientific Support Services, Rick Armstrong, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

Al Woodhouse Bursary

The bursary is awarded annually to a deserving post - secondary student studying science who is resident of Nunavut. The bursary administered by NRI is in memory of a well known science educator Al Woodhouse, who spent much of his life in Nunavut. Read more

For more information on the bursary contact NRI's Manager for Support Services, Rick Armstrong, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

Research Partnerships

Geomagnetic Observatory

The Geomagnetic Observatory in Iqaluit is owned by the Geological Survey of Canada (GSC) but operated by Nunavut Research Institute. NRI collects data at the observatory weekly. The data provides GSC with the necessary information to calculate the earth’s magnetic declination (position of the North Magnetic pole). The North magnetic pole appears to be drifting gradually over time for reasons not completely clear. This information is potentially valuable for navigation, global positioning, and telecommunications.

Water Quality Studies 



NRI has partnered with Dalhousie Univeristy's Centre for Water Resource Studies to establish a water quality laboratory in Iqlauit, Nunavut. The laboratory is the only facility in Nunavut dedicated to water research and is fully equipped to support quality controlled analysis of biological and chemical parameters in water and wastewater. Major equipment in the lab includes -80C and -10C freezers, spectrophotometers, assorted probes, a high tech. biosafety cabinet, reverse osmosis water purification system, incubators, bench-trop autoclaves, centrifuges, digital balances and much more.   The primary focus of research in the lab is to analyse wastewater from several Nunavut communities to better understand the general quality of the wastewater, and determine how and to what extent  wastewater quality changes as it flows through natural wetlands before entering the marine receiving environment. This study will help us understand the dynamics of wastewater in an Arctic climate and determine appropriate guidelines for Nunavut's municipal wastewater.  As the population of Nunavut's communities continue to grow, the need to develop effective systems to manage our wastewater is becomming more and more important.  To learn more visit Dalhousie's centre for water resource studies  



NRI is also using the laboratory to test water from streams and rivers around Iqaluit to monitor levels of inidcator bacteria (total coliforms and Escherichi coli) during the open water season. This long term monitoring program which was initiated in 2009 will help us understand how levels of bacteria in small streams and rivers change over the course of a year. We also also trying to determine whan bacteria levels are highest, and understand how factors such as river discharge, water temperature, and turbidity (the amount of dirt in water) affect bacteria levels. Every year we work with students from Arctic College to collect water samples weekly from 2 local rivers, beginning in early June when the rivers become ice free until freeze-up in late October.  We test the samples in our water lab using a special system called defined substrate technology (IDEXX) that allows for bacteria to be detected and counted quickly, reliably, and easily.


NRI student and ETP graduate (2010) Criag Beardsall incubates water samples for E.coli testing at the NRI water lab 

For more information on the water monitoring project please contact Jamal Shirley, NRI's Manager of Research Design




ReSDA is a Major Research Collaboration that brings together a broad range of disciplines and organizations representing universities, colleges, communities, government, the private sector and non-profits in northern Canada and other Circumpolar countries. This Northern Research Network has offices in the Yukon, Northwest Territories, Nunavut, and Nunavik.  The network's research is all focused around one key question: how can we ensure that a larger share of the benefits of resource developments stay in the region with fewer costs to communities?

Beginning April 1, 2011 this network started to develop, conduct and mobilize research aimed at the sustainable development of Arctic natural resources in a manner that will improve the health and well being of Canada's northern communities while preserving the region's unique environment. The Nunavut Research Institute hosts the ReSDA office in Nunavut and helps to plan a Nunavut based research.  For more information visit the ReSDA website.

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For more information on our programs and courses, contact the Registrar's Office at 1-866-979-7222

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